Find News
Year Published:

Find News
Topic:

Reliance Precision Limited

Phone: +44 (0) 1484 601000     E-Mail: sales@reliance.co.uk

Introducing the Robust Alternative to Optical Encoders

Magnetic Encoder Technology Comes to the Can-Stack Linear Actuator 

Alongside precision couplings, gears and intelligent motion control, Reliance Precision Mechatronics, the UK distributor for Haydon Kerk Motion Solutions, Inc., a premier manufacturer of engineered linear motion products, now offers an integrated magnetic encoder available on the 25mm 25000 Series linear actuators.

The extremely compact and fully enclosed incremental encoder utilises solid state technology and includes both analogue detection circuitry and full signal processing from a single chip.  When combined with the

Can-Stack linear actuator, excellent position feedback can be obtained for use in critical applications including medical equipment, analysis devices and robotics.

The 64 line quadrature encoder system utilises a high energy neodymium magnet and provides an 8 bit digital resolution, resulting in a total of 256 output pulses per revolution. The encoder provides 90 degree phase shifted A/B output channels along with a single index pulse for every complete shaft rotation. The encoder circuitry samples angular position at 10,000 samples per second for an output update every 100 microseconds.

The 256 pulse magnetic encoder is a great replacement for optical encoders and is virtually immune to vibration, shock, dust, and contaminants. The encoder can be operated using either a 3.3V or 5V input voltage. When combined with the Haydon 25000 series linear actuator, a robust, compact linear motion package is created.

The Haydon 25000 Series is part of the G4 line of high-output Can-Stack linear actuators and are "second to none" in performance when compared to similar sized actuators.  Improvements include optimised stator tooth geometry, high energy neodymium magnets, custom engineered polymers, and larger ball bearings for greater rotor support and axial loading.

Back To News